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20 Best Sales Books

SalesHQ

How to Master the Art of Selling

by Tom Hopkins


Whether you’re a seasoned sales pro or just starting out, How to Master the Art of Selling is a classic – an indispensable source of information that includes the five essential steps to successful selling. Guaranteed to give you the edge you need to excel in today’s competitive business environment, Master the Art of Selling is for anyone who is ready to realize their goals and fulfill their highest potential.

Tom Hopkins wasn’t born to wealth and privilege. He was a mediocre student and began his work life in construction carrying steel. At the age of 19, he was married with a child on the way and trying to find a better way to support his young family. Since he wasn’t afraid of meeting new people and was known to be somewhat talkative someone suggested he try selling. After looking around at the people who were dressed well and driving new cars, he decided on the field of real estate.

Tom’s first six months in real estate were anything but successful. He had sold only one home and averaged $42 a month in income. He was down to his last $150 in savings when a man came into the real estate office promoting a three-day sales training seminar with J. Douglas Edwards. Tom hadn’t yet heard of either “sales training” or Mr. Edwards. He decided to invest his last bit of savings in the program. Tom was so inspired by Mr. Edwards’ training that he became an avid student. He attended seminars, read books on selling and even invested in some vinyl records on self-improvement.

Tom applied everything he learned and by the time he turned 27, he was a millionaire salesperson in real estate. He set records that remained unbroken until this century. His last year as a real estate agent, he sold 365 homes—the equivalent of one each day. Grand total, he closed 1,553 real estate transactions in a period of six years.

Excerpt: I am not judged by the number of times I fail, but by the number of times I succeed: and the number of times I succeed is in direct proportion to the number of times I fail and keep trying.

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